A New Metal Festival Is Coming To Melbourne

11 January 2023 | 3:55 pm | Mary Varvaris

"The dawn of a new, annual metal fest has arrived. Five international and seven domestic acts of significant quality waging sonic war..."

A New Metal Festival Is Coming To Melbourne

(Source: Facebook)

Melbourne metalheads, say hello to the newest event coming to your city: Into The Fall festival.

The inaugural Australian metal festival caters more to the extreme/doom metal side of things, with local acts, bands across the country, and international artists filling up the first-ever line-up.

An action-packed day at The Croxton Bandroom is promised to punters on 18 March. Into The Fall that weekend and Knotfest the weekend after, anyone?

“The dawn of a new, annual metal fest has arrived. Five international and seven domestic acts of significant quality waging sonic war,” tour organisers wrote on social media. German technical death metal pioneers Obscura will headline the festival alongside Gatecreeper, the much-hyped American death metal newcomers making their Australian debut.


Joining them are the exciting death metal outfit Undeath, exclusive performances from the US slam group Stabbing and British thrashers Cryptic Shift.

Melbourne’s own death/doom metal band, the legendary Inverloch, will also perform alongside Aussie acts Freedom Of Fear, Altars, Carcinoid, Resin Tomb, Pestis Cultus and Growth. Tickets are going on sale this Friday, 13 January, at 10:30 am. Set a reminder for 10:30 am Friday here.

Into The Fall is curated and operated by two passionate metalheads: Matthew Chalk (vocalist of Tassie extreme death metal band, Mephistopheles, and the owner of Southern Extremities Productions) and Lochlan Watt (R U N vocalist and host of triple j’s The Racket).

“Inverlochstay true to the tenets of doom and death metal, offering a solid set that swings between frigid atmospherics and pummelling blast beats,” David Adams wrote in a concert review of Yob, Inverloch, and Whitehorse.

He added, “Frontman Ben James agonises over the microphone during the performance and is quick to offer a sincere thanks to the other acts on the bill. This duality is present throughout much of the show. Seemingly torturous performances are given, with gratitude, as opportunities for the audience to safely enact their own aggressions through horn-raising and head-banging.”