Emmure shout-out Knocked Loose, Attila, Thy Art Is Murder + more on ‘I’ve Scene God’


‘I’ve Scene God’ makes me wish June 26th would hurry up already. 



Following ‘Pigs Ear,’ ‘Gypsy Disco,’ and the most recent single, ‘Uncontrollable Descent,’ Emmure’s newest track, ‘I’ve Scene God,’ is another short and sweet dosage of bludgeoning, dissonant nu-metalcore. I’m personally loving that all of these new songs are on the shorter side; getting in and out, saying what they have to say, and still being satisfying in their heavy-ass execution. Everything I’ve written about the previous three singles from the band’s forthcoming record, ‘Hindsight‘ (which is out Friday, June 26th) also applies here in terms of tone, style, structure, riffs and breakdowns. It’s Emmure, it’s solid, and y’all know what kind of heaviness and core you’re in for by now with these guys.

However, what’s netted this latest single some extra attention and curiosity is it’s lyrics. Namely it’s middle rap-section, where Frankie Palmeri deliverers a dry, down pitch-shifted vocal where he name drops other bands in their scene, particularly: Attila, Fit For A King, Thy Art Is Murder, Knocked Loose, Stick To Your Guns and Stray From The Path. Here are the lyrics from said part for context, before the chorus repeats itself to close out this quick-fire nu-metalcore song:

“Say you stick to your guns. But you stray from the path. Not a killa like attila when you feel my fucking wrath. Broken teeth get knocked loose when I get nasty. Murder thy art when I’m stepping on a track, see. Nails in the coffin. Ice in my vein. Pass me the crown so fit for a king. See, you can be next. Yeah, you can be the one. But you’ll never be me. So you’ll never be God.”

Some fans and writers online have been “umming” and “uhhhing” over this since it’s release on Friday, but I really don’t think it’s a diss or a callout. It’s more of a shout-out to those other artists. During the visualiser for ‘I’ve Scene God‘ (found below), it shows live footage from all of these bands mentioned, but never in a mean or mocking way. Of course, there’s definitely some ego and posturing felt here, with the person/people whom Frankie is talking down to with these lyrics are basically been told that they’ll never ever live up to his “god” status in the music scene; that they ain’t shit to him and won’t even reach the level of the very peers that he name drops in the song’s pitched-shifted rap-section.

At least, that’s just my takeaway. What do you all think about it?


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