Postblue


With their debut album, ‘I Hope Their Praying For Me’ set for release later this month, we caught up with alternative Melbourne rockers Postblue to talk about the band, the album and the local scene.

 

Your debut album is coming out soon.  Tell me about the background of the album.

 

We started writing it at the start of last year. Went through some member changes and then did some pre-production in August and sent that to Poison City Records. They liked it and wanted to put it out for us so we went back, re-wrote some stuff and recorded it.

 

Awesome, how about the writing process, run me by how you guys tackle that aspect.

 

A lot of the songs I’ll just make a riff or chord progression and I’ll play around with it. get a lyric structure and I’ll take it to band practice and then we’ll go from there or, if I make a good set of words I’ll try and put some music to it. It changes a bit but it’s basically just building on the skeleton of the song.  

 

You write the lyrics to the album, so tell me what the idea behind the name of the album is about?

 

Those are the lyrics on the last song. It’s a short closer to the album. I didn’t realise till we recorded it that those set of lyrics where it comes from we’re the first set I actually wrote for the album. It was like four or so lines and we had a different name for the album but that song with the original title got thrown out.  

 

What was the recording process like, who’d you work with, where’d you work?

 

Our drummer has recorded everything we’ve actually done so we did at his place. His family just moved out and he’s made a home studio in his little study area so we tracked it there. It was originally going to be tracked live but a lot of shit went wrong and it ended up being done like your standard record. It was recorded in the space of three days.

 

Shit, that’s impressive. So what was your favourite part of the recording?

 

I think getting to listen to the end product was the best part. If it sounds like what you want it to then that’s going to be your favourite part. Another thing was that the bass player and myself live in Melbourne and our drummer lives in Byron so it was great to hang out for a few days whereas we don’t normally get to that unless we play shows.

 

How about the most challenging bit?

 

Having to do things over and over and over again. Like, you’ll start out liking a riff but after 18 tries or play throughs you hate it so much and you hate yourself for writing it. But after not listening to it you like it again and you’re all set.

 

Postblue is going to be touring with the well know local, Luca Brasi soon, how are you feeling for that one?

 

We’ve played with them a few times and they’re really cool, guys. Even if it’s just the two of us it’ll be great to just get together and get out on the road and play these songs. It goes for a few weeks so I’m really excited.

 

So what’s you’re favourite local band, besides Luca Brasi, to tour with?

Definitely our favourite local bands to play with are Endless Heights and Violent Soho. We played one of our first shows with them in 2012 and ever since whenever they’re touring they ask us to come out and play a show with them. And the boys in Violent Soho approached us last year to come and play some shows with them and they’ve been really supportive ever since, trying to get us doing bigger shows and whatnot.

 

So now as a local band, you have the best standpoint on this question. In your honest opinion do you see the local music scene in Australia growing or in a decline?

 

I’ve moved to Melbourne around October last year, and from what I’ve seen there seems to be a new show on every weekend that you can go to and there are new bands every week, playing shows the next month. It’s really growing I think because there’s way to many shows that I’m too broke to go to. The kind of music we play, we weren’t really prominent so to play a show, we would have to be playing with a hardcore band. But still, local music is still growing and expanding.  

 

So a final wrap up question, where do you see Postblue in five years?

 

Hopefully still going, but I hope to have played overseas, released another album or two and get some really cool guitars. And I still want to enjoy it and have it not feel like a job.

 

Leave a Reply

You must be registered and logged in to comment on this post.